Topic: Bass pedal adjustment  (Read 4591 times)

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Offline Robyn

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Bass pedal adjustment
« on: March 12, 2009, 11:50 AM »
Bart, I've been having trouble lately w/ my pedal--it's been doing a lot of traveling, and I'd wondered if something had gotten out of adjustment.  I was trying to tweak it last pm w/o much luck, then did some looking online and on the DC and found the great bass pedal video that you did--that helped very much--thanks!  But I still was having trouble getting doubles to happen evenly. This am, things are much better--I think the bass pedal fairy visited during the night, or else (like you mentioned in the video), I'm more relaxed this am!

I have a couple other questions about how different adjustments affect the pedal's action tho:

Adjusting the foot plate angle

Adjusting the length of the beater bar/rod

Thanks much, robyn
Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions.  Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too, can become great.           ~Mark Twain

Offline Bart Elliott

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Re: Bass pedal adjustment
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2009, 10:52 AM »
The pedal's foot plate angle is also going to affect the "throw" of the beater, meaning how far it comes back. Some pedals allow you to adjust the angle of the cam on the axis independently. This means you can get the spring tension and foot plate angle the way you want, then loosen and adjust the cam to set the "throw" (how far back) you want the beater.

The length of the beater shaft does two things. One, it determines where the impact of the beater to the batter head will take place; secondly, it affects the "throw".  Some people like the beater to strike directly in the center of the Kick drum batter head, which means you'll need a beater with a longer shaft. Most people, however, like the beater to strike just off-center, meaning below center. If you have a large diameter bass drum, you'll probably want a beater with a longer shaft, which various companies manufacture. If working with a small diameter bass drum, like a 18-inch, you'll probably want to shorten the length of your beater's shaft, which can be done with adjustments.  Finding the

The longer the beater shaft, the greater the distance the beater must travel to strike the batter head. You can compensate for this by decreasing the "throw" (how far back) the beater comes by adjusting the spring tension and the foot plate angle.

Keep experimenting and make a mental note of the set-up that works best for you. Every person is different. And when you change bass drums or drumhead tension, you will probably find that you need to adjust your Kick pedal as well.

Offline Robyn

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Re: Bass pedal adjustment
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2009, 09:44 PM »
Thanks Bart!   :)

robyn
Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions.  Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too, can become great.           ~Mark Twain

 

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