Topic: Fingers stop working into gigs  (Read 2065 times)

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Offline Johno Fisher

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Fingers stop working into gigs
« on: March 10, 2013, 05:33 AM »
I've been doing the Jojo Mayer clap warm up. It does help me but still into playing a gig I have no control of my fingers, the lower part of my palms hurt and everything is so tight even after extensive warm ups.

I play great playing. At home but after 12 years of playing I feel like I have only been able to bring that to the stage once! I think I
Might have a possible problem with my wrists forearms and hands been incredibly over tight on the muscles. I was told I had carpel tunnel followed by a contradicted answer from another doctor.

Anyone know how to prevent muscle seizing up In your hands forearms elbows and fingers? It can be agonising.

I tried ART once. (Active release technique )once it worked a bit but was very here and there .

Offline Chip Donaho

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Re: Fingers stop working into gigs
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2013, 03:06 PM »
Before playing a gig I shake my hands and wrists to warm up. Works for me....  :-\
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Offline Scot Holder

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Fingers stop working into gigs
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2013, 10:08 PM »
If you are not seizing up during practice sessions at home (and these sessions are as long as your gigs), then it has to be a technique difference that is causing the problem.  Take note of what you do before a practice session - not necessarily drum related, but the motions you go through before practicing. As simple as it may be, you may have a pre-practice "ritual."  If you can apply this ritual in some way before a gig it may help you get to a similar state of mind and relax your playing. You may also video yourself in both settings to identify the differences. It doesn't sound like a warm-up issue to me.

Playing a gig is fun, exciting and can also be nerve-racking. You may just need to find a method to stay more relaxed in that setting.

Offline Jon E

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Re: Fingers stop working into gigs
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2013, 08:11 PM »
Think about all the things you are doing with your hands at a gig that you don't do at your practice session, like carry heavy cases for instances.  Maybe you don't drink as many fluids (alcohol don't count!), or similar food.  Crazy as it sounds, these .ittle things might be making a difference--as well as the "nerves".

Offline Tim van de Ven

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Re: Fingers stop working into gigs
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2013, 02:42 PM »
I've been doing the Jojo Mayer clap warm up. It does help me but still into playing a gig I have no control of my fingers, the lower part of my palms hurt and everything is so tight even after extensive warm ups.

I play great playing. At home but after 12 years of playing I feel like I have only been able to bring that to the stage once! I think I
Might have a possible problem with my wrists forearms and hands been incredibly over tight on the muscles. I was told I had carpel tunnel followed by a contradicted answer from another doctor.

Anyone know how to prevent muscle seizing up In your hands forearms elbows and fingers? It can be agonising.

I tried ART once. (Active release technique )once it worked a bit but was very here and there .

This sounds like nerves to me, if you are able to play easily at home.

What is it that makes you nervous? Are you worried that you'll "lock-up" (a sort of self-fulfilling prophecy, in this case)? Is it the audience?

Try some relaxation techniques before you hit the stage. Try this as it was recommended by a famous NHL player; what he used to do was intentionally tense up his entire body and say to himself "This is nervous and tense"; then he'd relax entirely and say to himself "This is relaxed". He would repeat this over and over; this way, if he felt himself tensing up, he could say, "This is tense" in his mind and he would almost automatically relax.

 

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