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Zach Marks - Stimpy Lockjaw by Bart Elliott
April 22, 2014, 05:59 PM

Fighting laziness above certain tempos by Matthew Warwick
April 17, 2014, 11:45 PM

Nick Menza: First 'Intense Mega Drumming' DVD Webisode by Bart Elliott
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To Port or Not To Port by JeepnDrummer
April 17, 2014, 02:08 AM

Possible returning problems with cysts. Any ideas? by Bart Elliott
April 16, 2014, 06:01 AM

Recent Posts

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91
General Board / Re: Andy Ziker joins DRUM! Magazine team
« Last post by Andy Ziker on January 21, 2014, 09:52 AM »
Thanks again guys! After a little more than a week I can tell you that it's a fantastic but very challenging job. I'm working my tail off while enjoying it at the same time.
92
Technique(s) / Re: Notation qestions
« Last post by Joe on January 20, 2014, 11:57 PM »
I'm not sure that I understand your question. Could you rephrase the question a little differently?

Okay.

A lot of musicians use number charts when recording. Maybe even letter chord charts.  In my case, which is not recording but playing under the direction of someone who does and is quite familiar with that, I'm given either, and by the verses or on top of the chord I'll put a little phrase that I need to play just so.

I know a sheet of staves with traditional notation is sometimes still called a chart (I just felt such diligence from the OP deserved to be called music), and that such sheets are used among those who play "actual notes", especially on a film date.

I'm saying that I KNOW that staves of music must exist in some professional capacity -- there's books of transcriptions. I did zoom in and up the contrast on a recent photo of Steve Gadd, and his book has what looks to be a few phrases notated in a chart format -- sort of a high-falluting way of what I attempt. But, Crigger's mentioning of "sightreading", a resolution of mine by the way, got some wheels turning. Does it come up often where a drummer comes in on a date, is given a part of such detail as explained in the OP, and is expected to sight it in one take, MAYBE two? If so, where? Film dates as I mentioned? Other things?
93
Technique(s) / Re: Notation qestions
« Last post by Bart Elliott on January 20, 2014, 09:58 PM »
I've a question from someone who either writes a little notation on the side of a chord or number chart in the rare case when there's not time to straight-up memorize a part -- when is such music used when recording? I know it must be, but I've never seen examples.

I'm not sure that I understand your question. Could you rephrase the question a little differently?
94
Technique(s) / Re: Notation qestions
« Last post by Joe on January 20, 2014, 06:31 PM »
Charts?? This is straight-up music, isn't it? Good job!

I've a question from someone who either writes a little notation on the side of a chord or number chart in the rare case when there's not time to straight-up memorize a part -- when is such music used when recording? I know it must be, but I've never seen examples.
95
Technique(s) / Re: Notation qestions
« Last post by Scot Holder on January 17, 2014, 08:52 PM »
Thank you David!  Your explanations are very helpful. I am new to music notation for any instrument and I have struggled a bit with how to properly represent note duration with drums.  Your advice to represent duration based on how the other instruments play the music seems so intuitive, but it didn't dawn on me until you said it 'out loud' - thanks!

As for the up/down rests, my original intention was to declutter the staff.  But, again, your clear explanation was an 'ah ha' moment for me.  It may be a small thing, but most things we do are about getting the small things right.

Thanks again!
Scot
96
And now the site with 3 sample tunes is up: http://spokeofshadows.wix.com/spokeofshadows
97
General Board / Re: Andy Ziker joins DRUM! Magazine team
« Last post by David Kayser on January 14, 2014, 09:59 PM »
Congratz!
98
General Board / Re: Andy Ziker joins DRUM! Magazine team
« Last post by Jeff Johnson on January 14, 2014, 09:19 PM »

Congratulations!  It was great to see you again at PASIC.  Keep in touch.

Jeff

Jeff Johnson
99
Technique(s) / Re: Notation qestions
« Last post by David Crigger on January 14, 2014, 05:00 PM »
Scot -

As for #1 - you can either tie the 1/8th note to an 1/8th note (as you have in the stems up part of the 1st example) or you can define the space with a 1/8th rest as you have in the second example. Best rule of thumb I can think of for deciding which is to sing the music that goes with that part - in other words, how does everyone else play that "& of 4"? Do they play it short with a space between it and the note on the "& or 1" - or - do they play it as a long accented note? More than likely it will be best to write it for the drummer in a way that reflects what they are doing... even if the percussion note (tom, snare or bass drum) being played has no ability to change its duration. Cluing the drummer into what others are playing and how they are phrasing it is always a good idea.

2. Yes. This is actually the fatal flaw in both of these examples - making them at the very least, extremely difficult to read, let alone sight-read.

In any stems up/stems down part - be it drum set or a piano or violin part - promoting rhythmic comprehension ALWAYS takes precedence over any general rules as to which and where stems go up and go down.

Harking back to the early days of marching drum parts, drum set parts are most often written in a "two part" divisi style - meaning one parts stems up and one part stems down sharing the same single staff. This usually means grouping all of the notes being played into two rhythmically complete parts. This is often "hands up and feet down" - but can also be "bass drum/snare drum down and HH/Cyms up".

And depending the notes being played, oftentimes one section of the music works better grouped one way and other a different way... this is perfectly fine and pretty much standard practice. But at any given time, each group - stems up and stems down - must be rhythmically complete and readable as it's own entity.

Below are what the first two bars would look like grouped in two different ways...

One final thought - with drum set being intended be read by a single player - the rules are pretty fluid - with the focus all about being as readable as possible with as little clutter. So for instance if after a full set section, there's a section of just solo snare drum or HH 16ths for eight bars, there's no reason to slavishly write in all the whole note rests for stems down parts... as they aren't really separate parts being played be separate people, but part of one part for one player.

Yet another "final" thought - I know of no notation software that wants to write good drum parts without being forced, tricked and finagled into doing so. It is literally the worst thing they do. Why? Because the stems up/stems down aspect of drum set parts, unlike most other parts, follow a very involved and highly subjective set of "rules" - so besides the fact that they require the use of multiple layers per staff (like in divisi part), they don't follow any simple rule for doing so.) As a result it takes many, many times longer to notate a drum set part really well compared to say a bass or saxophone part.

Hope that helps,

David

100
Music, Musicians & Musicianship / Re: Love this!
« Last post by JeepnDrummer on January 14, 2014, 12:24 AM »
Agreed that he has many talents.  And while I'm sure he can out sing me with one vocal chord tied behind his throat, it seemed to me he was trying to sound too much like Sting.
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