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LOUNGE => General Board => Topic started by: teachesintx on March 15, 2006, 06:08 PM

Title: Can you read music?
Post by: teachesintx on March 15, 2006, 06:08 PM
I was just curious how many drummers can read music.   :o
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Mister Acrolite on March 15, 2006, 06:15 PM
Yes.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Scheming Demon on March 15, 2006, 06:17 PM
I can read it fine, comprehension is another thing!
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Dave Heim on March 15, 2006, 07:27 PM
Yes.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: KevinD on March 15, 2006, 09:03 PM
If you are referring to drum charts, the answer is a firm "yes."

If you are referring to music with notes, keys and melodies etc.. my answer is a cautious "yeah, in a music theory/piano 101 kind of way." I wouldn't be able to site read but I can figure stuff out on a keyboard well enough to muddle through.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Roger Beverage on March 15, 2006, 09:03 PM
Yes

Title: Can you read music?
Post by: David Jung on March 15, 2006, 09:06 PM
Yes, but that doesn't mean I can play it.  ;)
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Todd Norris on March 15, 2006, 09:21 PM
I can read in the snare drum rudimental way, or drum set chart.  I can't read the "staff".  A base knowledge of reading is a must IMHO.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: vexen on March 15, 2006, 09:41 PM
Yea, i just have problems sight reading, and reading guitar notation. I've been working on figuring out what notes are where, but i'm far off from memorizing anything on the guitar.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: James Walker on March 15, 2006, 10:04 PM
Yes - both drum set notation and "pitched" notation.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Bart Elliott on March 15, 2006, 10:19 PM
YES ... melodic, harmonic and rhythmic notation.

And a poll would have been more appropriate for this question.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Larry Lawless on March 15, 2006, 10:23 PM
Yes, thank you, yes I can.

Just gave a clinic at the Texas Music Educators Convention on this subject.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Mark Counts on March 15, 2006, 10:29 PM
Yes, I read music and have played 7 instruments in my life and sang for many chorus groups, and Choirs, and Bands.  But I don't read Drum music.  I play by feel with my ears and sometimes a bit of help from God!!! I sing lead vocals and play drums and I love to sing harmony too.  I won't rattle on anymore.
Yes, I read music!!!
                               Nutty
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: paul on March 15, 2006, 10:56 PM
Drum music, yes.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Bob Pettit on March 15, 2006, 11:09 PM
Yes!
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Chris Whitten on March 15, 2006, 11:13 PM
I can read music. I've studied harmony and theory etc.
I haven't used specific charts on 99% of the music I've recorded. However, I always write out my own cheat sheets based on drum notation, time is money people.  ;)
I think knowing how to read is an important bonus to your skill set. Also, from what I've seen, it is more or less an essential skill on the US circuit. Less so in Europe.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Louis Russell on March 16, 2006, 12:34 AM
Yes!
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: drummer1202 on March 16, 2006, 01:07 AM
Drum music - yes; not quite able to play by sight.
other music - I can read it very slowly and tell what it is but I don't play any other instruments and I can't sing in key, so chalk that up to a pointless ability.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: phantompong on March 16, 2006, 02:59 AM
Yes - drum notation, melodic notation and tab.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: efaubert1 on March 16, 2006, 05:06 AM
Yes, or at least I could years ago!
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: William Leslie on March 16, 2006, 06:00 AM
Yes.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Jon E on March 16, 2006, 07:04 AM
YouDamBetcha!
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: DFresh on March 16, 2006, 07:28 AM
Yes- Drum charts.  Reading a staff music like the for the piano is possible for me, but very slow.  My wife takes care of that part.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: DougB on March 16, 2006, 07:38 AM
I've dabbled with drum charts from time to time but haven't had an opportunity to dive into it too much.  When playing in my band, I follow along with the guitar/keys/vocal music, and some of them have notation for drums.

Although I must say that it is somewhat difficult for me to follow written music while trying to play drums.

Do you guys use the charts to learn the song and then play from memory, or do you actually follow the charts while playing?  If so, where do you place the written music?
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: dannydrumperc on March 16, 2006, 08:27 AM
Yes, and was quite good at first sight during school; developed the abillity of reading a bit ahead of what was going on too. But just rhythmic/drums notation. I'm quite slow reading and playing melodies on klock, xylo, etc.; never my forte.

I still construct in my mind drum charts when developing a new part and write them down for better understanding. It has been very helpful when playing with other drummers/percussionist because it gives me a clearer view of what’s going on and how I can compliment better their parts.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Scott on March 16, 2006, 08:42 AM
Yes.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Tony on March 16, 2006, 09:17 AM
Yep
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: jb78 on March 16, 2006, 09:22 AM
Yes.  That said, when I think about the amount of time I spent sight-reading in the first few years of drum lessons, I get sick to my stomach!  I hated it and I think the teacher over-emphasied that practice.

However, it's an important tool to have at your disposal.  Just as important is developing your own quick way of writing out parts and charts.  I frequently use that when the band and I are writing a song or when we're in the studio.  Sometimes things are moving quickly and you don't have time to beat it into your head.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Christopher on March 16, 2006, 09:40 AM
Yes.

And, I can read (and write) many, many other words as well.  ;)

Oh, I can also read music notation too.  ;D
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: felix on March 16, 2006, 09:56 AM
nahhh
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: diddle on March 16, 2006, 09:58 AM
Yes, snare & drumset music notation.  I use to read bass clef notation when I played timpani in high school, but that was a LONG time ago!
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: AdamBlevins on March 16, 2006, 10:01 AM
I believe that being able to read music notation (drum charts, pitched notation, figured bass/chord charts [of the I, IV, V, iii and the C, F, G, em variety], etc.) is essential if one wants to call onesself a musician.  This is something that I feel very strongly about.

I've been to several band auditions where the band members were amazed that I brought my own drum charts read during the audition.  ("Wow, I've never seen a drummer read music before!")

It amazes me how many "musicians" publicize the fact that they don't know how to read music.  (Yanni and Kenny G. come to mind).  Imagine a movie star accepting an Academy Award and saying something to the effect of, "If any kids want to become actors, you don't have to learn to read the English language...I don't know how to read the words on the script the director gives me, I just make everything up as I go along."  Of course in acting (as well as in music) improvisation is a very important skill, but so is reading!

Sorry to rant, but as I said before, this is something that I feel very stongly about.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: donelk on March 16, 2006, 10:47 AM
My ability to read gets me lots of gigs subbing for others. Just last night I sat in with a big band. Read all night.  
 
I also play symphonic stuff too, so that helps. But the big band reading is different than symphonic stuff.

Maybe that is one of the differences between being just a drummer and being a musician.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: minddrummer on March 16, 2006, 11:24 AM
YES I do !

Percussion notation mostly...
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Melofhell on March 16, 2006, 11:33 AM
Of course - that's why I'm the best around. *nods*

(School-wise)
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Apollo on March 16, 2006, 12:14 PM
Percussion Clef- Yes
Treble Clef- No

I would have thought reading drum music is a must  :-\
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: somebodyelse on March 16, 2006, 01:19 PM
In 5 clefs (treble, bass, alto, tenor, percussion). I've taken piano for 8 years.

For those of you who can't, I highly reccomend checking out  http://www.musictheory.net]this site . It's a great, easy, free way to learn to read music (I know that sounds like an advertisement, but I swear it isn't  :))
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: TMan324 on March 16, 2006, 04:46 PM
i can play chop-sticks and we a have bell (hand bell) choir at school that im forced to be in for music so i could figure it out but it would take a while like 3-4 days of practice before my whole class including me got the consept of playing together and on the right beat
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: gidgetman on March 16, 2006, 05:56 PM
Yep, all kinds. I'm starting to focus on learning treble and bass clefs better. At the moment its pretty sad watching me try to sight read mallets, lol.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Chris Whitten on March 16, 2006, 06:34 PM
I believe that being able to read music notation (drum charts, pitched notation, figured bass/chord charts [of the I, IV, V, iii and the C, F, G, em variety], etc.) is essential if one wants to call onesself a musician.  This is something that I feel very strongly about.

I'd find it very hard not to call The Beatles musicians.  ???
In fact a large portion of the most gifted rock and soul musicians cannot read music.
I think it's like anything in life.
Wouldn't it be great if every musician took the time to learn their instrument properly, read music and had a perfect technique.
However, it would be a very dull music scene if you were to dismiss some of the most important figures in popular music history because they didn't measure up to a strict definition of 'musician'.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Steve Phelps (Shoeless) on March 16, 2006, 07:36 PM
I'd find it very hard not to call The Beatles musicians.  ???
In fact a large portion of the most gifted rock and soul musicians cannot read music.
I think it's like anything in life.
Wouldn't it be great if every musician took the time to learn their instrument properly, read music and had a perfect technique.
However, it would be a very dull music scene if you were to dismiss some of the most important figures in popular music history because they didn't measure up to a strict definition of 'musician'.

I'm glad someone else said it. I can read drum parts and rhythm, but not chords, notes, scales, etc. But I can make all kinds of music on guitar and piano, self taught.  I remeber seeing a documentary about a guy who didn't know anything about music and wrote an entire film score for an orchestra, based on what he heard in his head. He was just very good at communicating what he wanted and found an "educated" musician who was patient enough to listen.
There is room for everyone in music.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Ryan Culberson on March 16, 2006, 08:51 PM
nahhh

I was beginning to think I was the only one here who can't read music (other than the most basic drum notation).  Then again, you may be kidding!  

No excuses, I just got started playing beats, and it snowballed from there.  I'm much less of a drummer because of it.  Don't remind me!  :)

The sad part (that I hate to admit) is that I had 10+ years of lessons with a really great drummer.  I always taped lessons and learned everything by ear.  I would literally fake my way through charts, because I had studied so much from the previous lesson.  

I kind of feel like Dexter Manley here, if anybody remembers that!  
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: rocksnob on March 16, 2006, 08:53 PM
Yes!.........but it's been quite a while......
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: DR on March 17, 2006, 06:48 AM
Yes, traditional and drum kit notation.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Jon E on March 17, 2006, 07:03 AM
Quote
I kind of feel like Dexter Manley here,

"Hail to the Redskins!"
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Eskil Sæter on March 17, 2006, 07:05 AM
I'm a trained pianist and brass band player, so I can read sheet music just fine. I've never had any formal training in drum notation though, but it's not hard to get if you know how to read "normal" music
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: felix on March 17, 2006, 07:25 AM
I was beginning to think I was the only one here who can't read music (other than the most basic drum notation).  Then again, you may be kidding!  

No excuses, I just got started playing beats, and it snowballed from there.  I'm much less of a drummer because of it.  Don't remind me!  :)

The sad part (that I hate to admit) is that I had 10+ years of lessons with a really great drummer.  I always taped lessons and learned everything by ear.  I would literally fake my way through charts, because I had studied so much from the previous lesson.  

I kind of feel like Dexter Manley here, if anybody remembers that!  

If you go to this thread  http://community.drummercafe.com/index.php?&board=10;action=display;threadid=16282;start=160;boardseen=1]http://community.drummercafe.com/index.php?&board=10;action=display;threadid=16282;start=160;boardseen=1

you will see what I use my old music books for- to angle my throne.   They also make good drink coasters.  I have not used them for T.P. or firewood kindling yet but knowing me it's entirely possible.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: TamaDrummer on March 17, 2006, 09:29 AM
Yes!
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: DougB on March 17, 2006, 11:43 AM
I've been to several band auditions where the band members were amazed that I brought my own drum charts read during the audition.  ("Wow, I've never seen a drummer read music before!")


Just last week my fellow bandmates said that they had never seen a drummer actually bring music to practice before.  Maybe the members of this forum are much different than the average run-of-the-mill drummer (many professionals here), because I don't think a big percentage of all drummers read music.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: TheAudiophobe on March 17, 2006, 12:28 PM
I'd find it very hard not to call The Beatles musicians.  ???
In fact a large portion of the most gifted rock and soul musicians cannot read music.


Two thoughts:
1) Sadly, not all of us are Beatles.
2) If a musician takes his/her craft seriously, why would she/he NOT learn to read music?

 
(yes, since age 4)
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Chris on March 17, 2006, 01:34 PM
Yeah, I can read drumset notation as well as melodic notation. Before picking up the sticks, I played piano and a vast array of brass instruments. I'd really like to get into guitar and start playing jazz piano as well. While I don't believe it essential to be able to read music, it certainly saves a tremendous amount of time.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Chris Whitten on March 17, 2006, 06:32 PM
Two thoughts:
1) Sadly, not all of us are Beatles.
2) If a musician takes his/her craft seriously, why would she/he NOT learn to read music?

Exactly. Like I said in my first post, it's a great skill to have.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Rylie on March 17, 2006, 06:53 PM
I learned to read music starting at age 8 (violin), then drums & percussion in high school band / orchestra, then taught myself to play guitar without ever reading a note or taking a lesson. I played bluegrass fiddle for several years (in a band) without ever reading a note of music other than looking at guitar chord charts which I could easily memorize. I'm a much better guitar player than I am a fiddler now, and as a retread drummer, I just don't have the patience or desire to follow written music - I just improvise by ear, and to me, that's music the way I like to play it.

I would never discourage anyone from learning to read music, especially kids, but I would never - never - imply that if you don't read music you aren't or can't be a "musician".  In fact, if someone can create a mood, invoke a thought, paint a picture with music, they're a musician as far as I'm concerned. See Robert Johnson.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Lori on March 18, 2006, 11:38 AM
I started off learning with drum music and it has been a really good thing for me. Because I cannot play in a band right now, I am always learning things out of books. My latest book is Rhythmic Aerobics by Jim Ryan. I still work out of A Funky Primer and others like that.  
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Melofhell on March 18, 2006, 11:44 AM
I guess since everyone else is, I'll say that I can read treble, bass, and percussion clef. I've never seen alto or tenor, though.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: drumz1 on March 19, 2006, 12:06 AM
Yes.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Gaetano Nicolosi on March 19, 2006, 11:55 AM
Yes!
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: diddle on March 19, 2006, 12:59 PM
You know, being able to read drumset music may not be absolutely necessary even if you want to make a career at drumming.  When I met Terry Bozzio he said he only began learning music theory after he became somewhat famous.  So it's certainly not a required skill.

But why wouldn't you want to learn to read?  The benefit of being able to read is that you can communicate more effectively with other musicians.  Being able to read will enable you to write down new grooves (even if only for yourself) that you learn so you can reproduce them later.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: mapexdrummer1234 on March 19, 2006, 11:54 PM
yeah
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: David Crigger on March 20, 2006, 02:52 AM
First - yes

To the person asked about reading at the drumset - for me, charts are only rarely only a tool for memorization. A good chunk of my playing life - school, jazz band, big bands, wedding gigs, shows, recording sessions, concerts - have all more often than not included reading music "on the gig".  Usually to the left of, or slightly above the hihat.

Are we all SO sure that none of the Beatles read music at all? Ringo, for one, was quite the working professional prior to joining the Fab Four. I'm just not sure that the lack of charts at concerts, or the need for Geo. Martin's assist with orchestrations precludes any of them from any familarity with musical notation. (But not a huge Beatles bio buff)

Aa for Terry Bozzio - really studying music theory is quite different think than merely knowing how to read. On many instruments, one can read great and still know very little music theory.


Again for me, the ability to read music has probably been the single largest contributing factor to me being "day job free" my whole life. :-)


David
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: FindingNorthport on March 20, 2006, 11:03 AM
NO, I can't read music.. I just learn by ear and natural ability. I have been playing for 10 years, and I am 20 now. I have never had a lesson, nor did I think it was necessary to learn to read music. If you can do without it, why waste your time.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Mark Counts on March 21, 2006, 10:43 PM
Hi TravisFitch,
I agree with you on the fact that you choose to be self taught.
So am I but, I will only say this one time.  Some lessons might have had speeded the process up?  I am 45 and I wish I was this good when I was 25. Keep on going!!!  I believe that drummers get better with age because of time or hours behind the kit.  It is a physical instrument so when we get older, it will challange us and we will keep playing as long as we can.
Carl Palmer turned 56 yesterday and I still think he is one of the best drummers in the world. Take Care,
                                         Nutty
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: DougB on March 22, 2006, 04:42 PM
Carl Palmer turned 56 yesterday and I still think he is one of the best drummers in the world.
                                       

I thought Palmer would have been older.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Mark Counts on March 23, 2006, 07:15 AM
Carl Frederick Kendall Palmer was born in Birmingham, England, on March 20th, 1950.  From the beginning it was clear that music was in the stars for the young Carl Palmer. http://www.carlpalmer.com/carl-bio.html.
Here is Carl's link if you want to know more about him?
                        Nutty
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: justdave01 on April 17, 2006, 11:04 AM
Not quite fully sight, but yes with about 10 minutes with it.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Joe on April 17, 2006, 04:24 PM
If you can do without it, why waste your time[?]

To be able to do more with It.

By the way, I can read rhythm notation, bass clef and treble clefâ€"all rather slowly.  So, that would qualify as a "yes".
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: onuspro on April 17, 2006, 06:29 PM
Not the first note.  I, too, chose to be self-taught in my formative years, relying on my ears and eyes to pick things up.  To tell the truth, after 17 years of playing, my biggest regret is not getting a formal education.  When it comes to the basics, I don't know s**t from shinola.  Does my playing suffer from it?  Absolutely.  To this day I can't muster a paradiddle faster than 120 bpm.  I've been voted the fastest feet in South Carolina after a Battle of Bands.  My playing has been described as "rock solid" and "tastefully creative", and "a musically genetic mix of Portnoy and Vinnie Paul." (a dubious claim, but hey, I'll take it, written by a local magazine writer that was a friend and kind of biased towards my band anyway, but that's a separate story)  If only they knew how ignorant I really am.  To not know basics that everyone else is taught from the beginning is downright sad.   You bet I wish I had that bag of tricks to draw from.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: DWdrmr on April 17, 2006, 06:54 PM
I, sadly, must say that I...have only a rudimental..NO,..a less than Music 101 ability to read drum notation. I started  taking lessons the last part of '05 for rudiments and sight reading skills, and came to the conclusion that for me the old.. listen to the song till you get it, and, for original music...listen to the song till you get it  ::), works. I play out 3 or 4 nights a week and practice time is getting rare.
My mother sent me to piano lessons when I was 11 for about 6 months. The only instrument I have ever wanted to play was drums..when that became evident to her,(I did'nt practice) I was left to my own devices.
At this point, where it is a pure hobby, and no chance of ever doing anything with music professionally, it really does'nt warrant lessons to learn how to read, nor does it matter outside of a purely academic
endeavor... for me.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Chip Donaho on April 17, 2006, 09:57 PM
Yes, I had to read all drum/percussion music in both school and Army band. But I have to admit it's been a while. But it's about time to drag out the old "Haskel-Harr" books and teach my grandson. Most of the bands I've played with for covers couldn't read a newspaper let alone music. Now you've got me thinking....Where's my old "Conneticut Halftime"?, that was a favorite workout.    :)
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Benjamin8888i on April 19, 2006, 04:19 AM
I used to play without notes and I literally cracked myself up trying to play beats that I didn't know were off beat syncopated. I was wondering WHYYYYYYY I can't seems to play the hi-hat part properly with the snare part or bass drum little did I realized today that they were off beat syncopated patterns which I was trying to play.

Today, with my skills of reading drum notes and understanding; it has all helped me to identify and to correct those beats which I attempted to play last time. Now it is as easy as ever! I also learned that they were hard rock beats with steady eights on the hi-hat and some snare parts on the e & ah and dotted sixteen bass lines. No wonder I couldn't seems to get them right last time.

Learning to read drum notations has helped me to play beats that I would otherwise have never have been able to figure out in a lifetime!! I can still remember I almost freak out last time trying to play a rock pattern that involves the bass drum to play on the
((1) e (+) ah  2 e (+) (ah) (3) e (+) ah 4 e + ah) and the snare part to be played on the
(1 e (+) ah 2 e + ah 3 (e) + ah (4) e + (ah)) with straight eights on the hi-hat. I thought it was insane! I was wondering how to combine them? I seems to know it yet couldn't play it!! ;D

Reading drum notes is very important for my success; I come to realize it. :o
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: BigBillInBoston on April 19, 2006, 07:38 AM
Yes, all kinds of drum parts reasonably well "at sight" and  basic melodic notation. No music theory or skills to speak of on melodic instruments (percussive or otherwise).

Can't imagine why reading drum charts (at least) isn't a good thing for any drummer no matter how "naturally" talented they are. It allows you to learn techniques, grooves, fills and "sticking" that can not be easily discerned from listening and more improtantly, lets you play with people and songs you are not familiar with.

In my younger days I worked for an entertainment agency and did everything from big band jazz to rock to local productions of broadway shows to playing for Circuses (yes, that was fun  ;D). Can't do that without the ability to read cause in most cases you don't know what you'll be playing before you show-up.

BigBill
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Benjamin8888i on April 19, 2006, 10:17 AM
Btw, I forgot to mention one very important aspect of reading music from my experience;

I can never play Jazz beats and appreciate it if not because of reading. Ultimately I learned one of my favourate music piece which is Jazz, totally from reading. Honestly speaking, I can never play Jazz beats properly without reading:D Now I have opened myself to a whole new world of Jazz drumming which is so different from straight rock; and I didn't know it was so nice/cool!
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: lilblakdak on April 20, 2006, 12:18 AM
Not anymore.
Learned how over 20yrs ago and havent used it since.  In the genre I play in its very and I mean very rarely brought up.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: mississippithunder on April 26, 2006, 09:24 AM
Just cause the blind man cant read the sign that says toilet dont mean he dont know how to use it ;)
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: drumwild on April 26, 2006, 09:33 AM
I do know how to read. Started reading trumpet music in 1st grade, and moved on to drum music long before I got to college to study Percussion Arts. And Theory is definitely way different, but I learned how to read for ALL the clefs as a part of that.

Reading hasn't been required too much for me. Although one time a well-known drummer friend (whom I won't name) threw a gig my way because it required reading. Paid $1,000 per day and lasted for 9 days. In this situation, I was glad that I could read.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Tony on April 26, 2006, 10:15 AM
I do know how to read. Started reading trumpet music in 1st grade, and moved on to drum music long before I got to college to study Percussion Arts. And Theory is definitely way different, but I learned how to read for ALL the clefs as a part of that.

Reading hasn't been required too much for me. Although one time a well-known drummer friend (whom I won't name) threw a gig my way because it required reading. Paid $1,000 per day and lasted for 9 days. In this situation, I was glad that I could read.

Similar experiences.  I am not required to read very often, but it makes it easier for me to make notes as I develop charts for tunes on a session.  But more importantly, I end up getting very lucrative one offs because of my reading skills.  

Whenever a drummer is needed in or around the Gump, and it requires chart reading, I'm usually one of a handful that gets the call.

Reading can only open more doors.  Notes are the language of our craft;   why limit yourself?
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: Dave Heim on April 26, 2006, 06:04 PM
Just cause the blind man cant read the sign that says toilet dont mean he dont know how to use it ;)

True, but the guy who can see is more likely to nail the activity properly every time - with less of a chance of um. . .  missing the target.
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: DrummerMom on May 10, 2006, 10:02 AM
Yes
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: spirit on May 10, 2006, 11:40 AM
I can, was lucky to be taught how to by my drum teacher in school, he was an ex bbc drummer in the days when they had big bands playing for them, he was called Micky Greaves, a great man since sadly passed on.

He taught me, every beat you can imagine, all the latin and then some, from there I have built on what he has taught me and am and will be always grateful to him for the gift he gave me!

 ;D

I dont read much now and I play blues in a band. Have a look!
www.blues-is-truth.co.uk
Title: Can you read music?
Post by: armitage on May 11, 2006, 05:18 PM
yes, i can read and play sheet music, and read music for piano, most brass instruments, pitched percussion, and a few other things here and there.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: felix on May 11, 2006, 05:31 PM
Not very well
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Shane Stylianos on May 13, 2006, 08:22 AM
I can sight read most drum music, and I'm a bit slower on pitched note, but I can read those as well.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: rca on May 13, 2006, 06:30 PM
Yes.
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: Benjamin8888i on May 16, 2006, 05:47 AM
I dislike reading tie notes. (Notes that are bonded together).
Sometimes I get confused and play the prominant parts twice eg. crashing the cymbal twice in triplet timing instead of once with the same measure/timing.
Example in dotted sixteens; (can also replicate triplets).

Wrong method: 1 e + CRASH CRASH. Crashing on the "ah" and "2" simituanously is wrong.

Correct: 1 e + CRASH 2. Crashing on the "ah" alone is correct.

As you can see, "2" is already the new note part and the "ah" of the old note part is tied to the "2" of the new note(Which is the duplicated note). In written music, the tie notes are written twice with a tie in-betwen and can be quite confusing. You just need to play on the correct one and rest on the duplicated one still keeping timing (As if you had played the note twice).
Title: Re:Can you read music?
Post by: METALDRUMMER on May 16, 2006, 07:20 PM
Yea. I'm not the best, but enough to get me through.