Recent Posts

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General Board / Tuning toms to notes or perfect 4th's with a Tune-Bot
« Last post by beyondbetrayal on March 14, 2019, 06:44 PM »
Here is a video I made tuning my toms to perfect 4th's using the Tune-bot



A few quick points

1- These heads were replaced over a year ago when I recorded an album. They have been used almost daily for a year and still worked out pretty good.

2- I tuned my drums over 4 days ago and have played a lot so they are not in perfect tune now. (still sound good)

3- I did minimal processing. There is a slight limiter/compressor on the main channel to prevent clipping. I put some small EQ on the toms to make it represent the natural sound more. There is a dip at 500hz, and a small boost around 100-200hz. as well as 6000 I think. Noting too crazy. It sounded fantastic while playing these in the room.

I am sold on tuning to specific notes now in the same scale.. I'm going to try many more combos. Keep an eye out for a snare video as well.
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Hi everyone! I haven't posted here in a while. Just wanted to share this video of me singing and playing drums, guitar and bass to "Come Together" by The Beatles. Hope you enjoy! :)
Lindsay

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Percussion Parlor / Re: Conga Head Size Determination Measurements
« Last post by Bart Elliott on February 28, 2019, 05:47 AM »
Sorry for the late response, Jason.

Purchasing pre-formed/pre-seated skin drumheads for congas, bongos, djembes, etc., are always very tricky. As you've pointed out, there are a lot of variances... so it's always best to purchase a replacement head recommended by the manufacturer. What do you do when the manufacturer goes out of business or discontinues a particular model of drum? Well, that's the issue you ran into.

I would always suggest taking the original head off, measuring the flesh-hoop and points of bearing edge contact... to assure proper head replacement.

If the flesh-hoop works but the pre-formed bearing edge shape does not, you can always soak the head in room temperature water over night ... softening it enough to be reshaped and seated on your drum.

As you mentioned, you will probably just need to purchase some raw hyde and reuse the existing flesh-hoop from your existing drumhead. It's not tough to do, but can be a little tricky if you've never done it before. Check/search the Drummer Cafe forum for previous discussions on the topic.

I also recommend, when possible, to visit your local drumshop and solicit their assistance with getting the correct head for your drum. The service you receive is well worth the extra $$$ you'll spend by purchasing from them rather than online.

Keep us posted!
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Shameless Self-Promotion / New album finished.
« Last post by beyondbetrayal on February 24, 2019, 10:04 PM »
My metal band finished up getting our new CD mixed / mastered finally. I took a few of the clips from recording and put them over one of the new tracks. (Video editing is not my specialty)  I am pretty happy with how everything turned out musically. There is lots of blast beats and double kick so if that's not your cup of tea you might not enjoy this. haha



You can follow us on our facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Dissolutionca if you enjoy it.
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General Board / Re: I'm New Here ... (introduce yourself)
« Last post by Bart Elliott on February 24, 2019, 09:53 PM »
Hello, Dan here.     I'm 64, been playing drums for 50 years now. I had 2 carpal tunnel surgeries and a thumb reconstruction in my right dominant hand It is extremely hard to play matched grip in my right hand, and am considering traditional grip in my right hand! Yes, my right hand! Anybody out there been there n done that?

Welcome, Dan!

Glad you are still playing despite all that you've gone through physically. I haven't played reversed Traditional grip much, simply because I haven't had a need... and I've got plenty to work on already.

There are some players out there who play reversed Traditional grip... and are right-handed. One particular individual I've seen do this is Billy Cobham... but he doesn't more for fun (and to show off  ;D ) than doing it out of necessity.
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General Board / Re: I'm New Here ... (introduce yourself)
« Last post by Daniel L Brown on February 24, 2019, 04:38 PM »
Hello, Dan here.     I'm 64, been playing drums for 50 years now. I had 2 carpal tunnel surgeries and a thumb reconstruction in my right dominant hand It is extremely hard to play matched grip in my right hand, and am considering traditional grip in my right hand! Yes, my right hand! Anybody out there been there n done that????
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Gear / Equipment / Instruments / Re: finger knocker for use with cajon?
« Last post by David Fass on February 23, 2019, 09:24 PM »
Thanks very much.  I appreciate the info!
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Percussion Parlor / Conga Head Size Determination Measurements
« Last post by Jason Carr on February 23, 2019, 08:49 PM »
Hello out there, new user here!
I understand to measure from bearing edge to bearing edge, or the actual drum itself with the head removed.  Hear me out here.  I first measured the old rawhide head after I removed it, from middle of bearing edge to middle of bearing edge and it was app. 9.5 in, the drum shell itself is 9.0 in from BE to BE.  The larger conga Toca drum measured 10.75 from BE to BE, but the head is fine.  After taking a crash course in buying drum heads online, I took the plunge and purchased a 10 in Toca TP-40110 4010 & 4070 Fiberglass Series 10" Conga rawhide head.  The drum in question here is an old Toca Kaman Thailand Fiberglass conga, accompanied by a matching Toca Kaman 11 inch Conga.  I assumed that the 10 inch conga is the quinto and the 11inch is the Conga and not a tumba.  These drums were purchased used in 93, so they could go back to the 80's.  Toca is not making Kaman congas anymore that I can find, but the heads seem to be comparable to the model I purchased.  I wanted someone more experienced than me to set me straight here if I am incorrect in my assumptions and my conga head purchase.  It will be here in a week or so.  So we will find out eventually.  Thanks for reading...

**Update: The new skin's bearing edge fit perfectly on the shell of my conga, but the flesh ring was too small for the rim, even with bending the hoops a tad with the end of a socket wrench for leverage.  I ended putting the old head back on and will possibly try to buy some flat skin and do it right.  There is only one other type of 10 inch prefab skin Toca makes.  The new skin has a a short collar compared to the original head, which had a deep collar of at least another .5  inch above the flesh ring. 
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Gear / Equipment / Instruments / Re: finger knocker for use with cajon?
« Last post by Bart Elliott on February 22, 2019, 08:58 PM »
David,

You could wear a ring and use it to simulate the "wood block" or "cross-stick" sound while playing the cajon, but you will eventually tear up the wood on the cajon's playing surface doing that. I have tore up the playing surface just by curving one finger to play with the tip of the finger with the nail edge coming in contact with the wood surface. It sounds great, and gets the sound you are asking about, when played near the corner of the instrument. The problem — it tears up the cajon surface AND can cause you to split a finger nail.

Something that I do to achieve the sound you seem to want is to use my knuckle to knock up in a corner of the playing surface, or to use a marimba mallet with a rubber-ball end. The mallet works well in that it won't damage the instrument, and it doesn't hurt after many hours of playing... like my knuckle.
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Gear / Equipment / Instruments / finger knocker for use with cajon?
« Last post by David Fass on February 22, 2019, 10:44 AM »
Hi.  New here, hope someone can help me.  Played a cajon recently and loved it.  Is there some kind of device that one can wear on the hand to simulate "wood block" or "side-stick" sound while playing?  I'm thinking that a thumb ring or something like that would facilitate getting this sound.  Is there such a thing, or does one need to resort to a foot pedal?  Thanks!
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