Topic: Little sister wants to be a drummer  (Read 2206 times)

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thadvde

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« on: January 25, 2006, 02:19 AM »
Hello to all the drummers out there.

   I have a few questions about drums for you guys. I play guitar and harmonica, I've got no experience with drums at all. I rarely even work with drummers.
   Anyway, I've got a little sister(14) that I've been trying to get into music for a while. She came to me a couple weeks ago out of the blue and asked if I could help her get into drumming. So I bought her a practice pad, some sticks and a metronome; and let her go at it. I don't want to push her into something she'll hate.
   Anyway, now here we are a few weeks later and she's learned a couple basic things off the internet. She can play a rock beat, a swing beat, and something that sounds like bossa nova. The pad wasn't enough so she's got some a mustard lid, mayo lid, and coffee can.
   I want to get her a decent starting kit, it seems like she might make a go of this and I don't want to have to buy another set in a few months. My goal is to get something that won't clear my checking account, and something that she can gig with if she ever has the need. I also need to know what I'm going to have to get along with the kit. The guy at the music store said to check out the Pearl Soundcheck.
Any and all advice is appreciated.

Offline Shane Stylianos

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2006, 07:32 AM »
With it sounding like she might keep a go at this, I would think along the lines of a Pacific MX, Yamaha Rydeen or Stage Custom, Tama Swingstar, etc.  All between 600 & 800 dollars.  Then pick up a half-way decent cymbal pack (300-800).  Any one of those would hold her over for at least a couple years, until she could start spending her own money to start switching things out to what she wants.  Plus, on a better kit, you get a higher resale value, either for trade in, or outright selling if she really doesn't stay interested.  Definitely check ebay for any good deals.
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Offline bryanseyes

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2006, 01:54 PM »
I feel it should be stated that the Export isn't technically a beginner kit (that spot being reserved for forum and soundcheck) and anyway it's over 700 bucks i don't think she needs that yet, really.  I'd recommend the Yamaha rydeen since i've played it, resonated well for a cheap kit, i didn't like the bass at all but it needed new heads.  I think if the soundcheck is in the same pricerange it's gonna be the better buy, definitely.  I own an export and Pearls hardware and drums are definitely quality and meant to last.  The rydeens pedal and hi-hat weren't very nice- but i still recommend it!  I wish you very much luck my friend, because buying a drumset can be a major pain in the a$$ (i love you Mr. A).
I gave 'em a drum solo they couldn't refuse

thadvde

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2006, 04:06 PM »
Thanks for the advice. I'm still looking around but I hope to make my decision soon. I have a few more questions.
What is considered a good grip?
How should one position their arms when playing?
How do you make the stick hit more than once per stroke?
What is entailed in a good stroke? Do you play different drums differently?
Do you hit different parts of the drums?
What are some good practice pad regimens?
Does anyone know of a website that answers these kinds of basic questions?

Any input is appreciated.

chefdoug

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2006, 04:57 PM »
I would say the best way to learn this stuff would be to get her a good teacher.

Secondly, a good website to check out is....
http://www.vicfirth.com/education/wessels_beginner-lessons.html

They have many video lessons and other cool stuff to look at.

DWdrmr

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2006, 07:00 PM »
I agree with Cheffie..the Vic Firth site is excellent.
I remember when I first started playing in the '60s as a teenager..a girl drummer???....they can't do that.. or sports... ::)
Guess that myths been put to rest..
Sheila E. and Cindy Blackman,etc..and some smokers (playing wise) :), I've seen on Drummerworld, whose names escape me at the moment.. ::)amazing women behind the kit. Put me to shame.
I agree, this little lady needs to be encouraged...a pad, school band later on..who knows? 8)

Offline Todd Norris

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2006, 07:13 PM »
I would say the best way to learn this stuff would be to get her a good teacher.

Just wanted to second that recommendation.  Lessons will pay off more than the kit itself at this point.  

Offline Roger Beverage

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2006, 08:30 PM »
Thanks for the advice. I'm still looking around but I hope to make my decision soon. I have a few more questions.
What is considered a good grip?
How should one position their arms when playing?
How do you make the stick hit more than once per stroke?
What is entailed in a good stroke? Do you play different drums differently?
Do you hit different parts of the drums?
What are some good practice pad regimens?
Does anyone know of a website that answers these kinds of basic questions?

Any input is appreciated.

The teacher should come first.  He/she may also have connections to good used stuff.  Any of the BRAND NAME entry level kits will do,  just stay away from those ebay full kits for $200.00.  Used top line cymbals are the only way to go.

Roger

coolbob

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2006, 08:43 PM »
Lessons can really help, even if it's just a neighbor who knows a few basic beats.  As for a set check used first because uasually you can find a ton of good deals.

thadvde

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2006, 03:34 AM »
Many thanks to everyone for all your advice. Chefdoug, thank you much for the vicfurth.com link. I was going to get her a book or a movie but this is such a great website I don't think I will need to for a while. I went to the music store today and got some instructors business cards for when she gets tired of the practice pad and surfing the web. I'm going to let her bug me for a few more weeks after that until I get her a kit. Maybe start off with a good quality snare drum, she showed me the one she wants; a pacific805... the purple one(they match the new sticks). Then get her the full kit at the beginning of the summer.
Thanks again, and keep the advice coming. You guys are awesome.

thadvde

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2006, 07:47 PM »
Okay, I was telling a friend about my sister picking up the drums, and he had a friend that had an extra snare drum from days long past. He was $50 short on a car payment, so I ended up getting a Mapex Maple Deluxe snare and a stand off him for $65. The top playing surface has some dings scratches on it but the rest of the drum and stand is in great shape as far as I can tell. I found some resources for tuning and such on the net but what I want to know is; was $65 a good deal or did I get ripped off.
Thanks.

coolbob

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2006, 08:25 PM »
Sounds like a good deal to me.  Also remember, you can always replace the top head (a.k.a. "playing surface) and just buy a new one.  If you do, make sure that it is a snare drum head because those will stand up to a heavier use than say a tom head.  You may also want to invest in a drum key if the snare didnt come with one.  

ritarocks

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2006, 11:08 PM »
"Little sister...hits the stage!  She can't help it, she's coming of age..."

Offline bryanseyes

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2006, 11:39 PM »
Sounds like a good deal to me.  Also remember, you can always replace the top head (a.k.a. "playing surface) and just buy a new one.  If you do, make sure that it is a snare drum head because those will stand up to a heavier use than say a tom head.  You may also want to invest in a drum key if the snare didnt come with one.  
Yeah you might want to consider Possibly thiNKIng about Maybe looking for a drumkey.  LoL

Playing surfaces come and go, but bias lasts forever.  Personally i like using remo pinstripes that aren't even coated on snares.   It's always a matter of opinion though, and for that matter a never-ending quest for a better set-up. (especially for Pirate Pig, love you man [and mr A. too])

I think 65 bucks for a worthy snare's a great deal, but i mean, it isn't an acrolite, so..  $#!%.  

I still think you should buy your lil sis a kit, but definitely let her bug you about it awhile, and get a good deal!  I've been really happy with my decision and i looked around ALOT before i put any money down- ended up being an unbeatable sale at a local music store one saturday.  

That being said, i hope you're prepared to be annoyed- i took lessons for a couple months but took to it really quick so my parents bought me a set and i was playing the same funk beat for like a year with maybe 3 fills, my parents are just too cool.  But having a kit will keep it fun for her and she can practice alot more and teach herself.  She does need lessons though (i mean after i stopped taking lessons i was still in band, and eventually jazz band and pep band, always playing the set even in regular band whenever possible, 1st chair, thank-you, thank-you [small school])   :o
I gave 'em a drum solo they couldn't refuse

mapexdrummer1234

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2006, 09:17 AM »
If your looking for a good begginer drumset, there are some useful past threads I suggest looking at. One thing to remmeber is that even if she is going to keep at it, she doesn't need a really good kit. Mine was about 600, which is a good deal. It's not a "begginner" per say (the quality is better than other beggning kits I've heard) so it has great sound, but it costs as much as some upper beggniner kits (its a mapex fyi). For cymbals, if the store has some used cymbals I would suggest a crash, ride, hi hat. Use the heads on the drums until those break, which if they suck, they will break quicker than If they are good, and if they are good, replacing them wouldn't have been necessary.


Offline Dave Heim

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2006, 09:31 AM »
. . . Use the heads on the drums until those break, which if they suck, they will break quicker than If they are good, and if they are good, replacing them wouldn't have been necessary. . .


I disagree with the 'play them till they break' part.  Replacing stock or previously pounded heads with good-quality new heads will go a long way toward making a drum set sound good.  Even an inexpensive set.
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mapexdrummer1234

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Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2006, 11:17 AM »
I disagree with the 'play them till they break' part.  Replacing stock or previously pounded heads with good-quality new heads will go a long way toward making a drum set sound good.  Even an inexpensive set.

I see what you mean. But if they are good enough to use, even if they aren't good.... they could be used to practice beats.

I meant don't feel like you have to replace heads if they aren't really good.

Offline bryanseyes

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Re:Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2006, 12:31 PM »
The teacher should come first.  He/she may also have connections to good used stuff.  Any of the BRAND NAME entry level kits will do,  just stay away from those ebay full kits for $200.00.  Used top line cymbals are the only way to go.

Roger
I TOTALLY agree with that.  

As far as not replacing the drumheads until they're broken, wow, can i just say that this kid i was giving lessons a while back has a rydeen and the stock heads were dented to $#!@ and sounded absolutely wretched but they never did break before the new ones i talked his mom into ordering showed up.  And i mean, trust me, i know how to break a head ;D.  

When you do find a teacher and when lessons start, make sure you talk to him/her about what he/she is actually teaching your sister.  I'd suggest she just starts out on the set, i mean, i learned how to read music and play some marching stuff, some rolls, double stroke rolls, etc.. first, but knowing how to read music and being able to play written music is a different thing, and that being said that month of lessons was probably a waste of time for my current application.  Sure it helped back then when i was in band, but... w/e...  I just think you should be wary they don't waste too much time sitting her in a room practicing rudiments while you pay for it, make sure she gets behind a set sooner than later..   >:(
I gave 'em a drum solo they couldn't refuse

Offline James Kitchin

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Re: Little sister wants to be a drummer
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2020, 11:33 AM »
Hey there, I recently answered a lot of your questions on a piece I wrote: "how to play drums for beginners", it makes learning the drums online super easy (I hope).

I cover:

Develop a clear understanding of rhythm
Discover which songs you should practice
Learn how bass and snare interact
Include 8th notes in your playing
Practise common drum beats with or without drums
Understand what drum equipment (if any) you need
Find out how to hold your sticks properly
Experiment with your drum grip
Name the parts of a drum kit
Recognise and be able to read drum sheet music and tab
Work on your drum rudiments
Sharpen up your timing with a metronome
Figure out drum fills to add variety to your playing

Hope this helps!
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