Topic: Cymbal Size  (Read 971 times)

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yasha32

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Cymbal Size
« on: December 17, 2006, 06:43 PM »
ok, as of now as some of you may know, I am beginning to play drums (so far it's awesome) but my budget hasn't really allowed for me to purchase everything at once (others may note the step ladder throne I use) so now that I'm looking to get a crash cymbal, I'm a little lost on what all the sizes really translate out to. I figured bigger was deeper and louder, and smaller was higher and less noisy but I really don't know for sure. If someone can smooth out what the sizes really do come out to that'd be awesome. Thanks!

By the way I'm looking for a crash. I already have a ZBT hi-hat and a 20" planet-z ride.

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Re: Cymbal Size
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2006, 06:51 PM »
There are a lot of factors that affect the sound of the cymbal ... the diameter, thickness, bell size, etc.

Generally speaking, larger cymbals will tend to be louder and deeper in pitch. I would go with a 16-inch Crash ... Medium Thin if you can. To me, that's a good general sounding Crash cymbal that will work in a wide variety of musical situations.

Visit www.sabian.com and check out the cymbal vault. You can listen to numerous sound clips of all their cymbals, and you can hear the difference  ;D ... and how the sizes vary with a given style or model.

yasha32

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Re: Cymbal Size
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2006, 08:27 PM »
Thanks a lot for the link, that actually helped out. That was a quick response much appreciated.

marker

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Re: Cymbal Size
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2006, 02:34 PM »
I think 16" is a good one.  18" medium thin is good, too, for general amplified playing.

I would consider the type of  playing you do when picking cymbals.  If you're a heavy hitter, you should consider larger sizes and thicker weights.  Smaller, thin crashes will have short life span under those conditions.