Topic: Floor Toms  (Read 2210 times)

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DrummingFrenzy

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Floor Toms
« on: January 09, 2003, 01:26 PM »
Just thought I'd post an interesting fact and a question. This is to those of you who have a set that has standing floor toms, in other words floor toms with legs for support. If you've had you're drums set up in one place for atleast a couple hours, try picking up your standing floor toms and give them a shake back and forth. Just pick them up and shake them all around and set them back down. You'll notice that after you do that they will have more resonance. If you play on them for an hour or two, you'll want to do it again every once in a while. You'll especially notice it if you're playing on your drums for a while then you do it. It's almost like the sound settles and you have to stir it back up again. Weird. Make sure you hit the drum before you shake it so that you will notice the significant difference. Now, maybe some of you can tell me why that it is?

drumhero

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2003, 01:34 PM »
Maybe as the drum sets on the floor, the rubber feet get compressed bringing the metal leg closer to the ground, thus reducing the amount of suspension between the leg and the solid floor, reducing resonance.  Just the simple act of picking it up allows the feet time to rexpand, bringing the seperation factor back into play.  When it does that again, try just picking it up and holding it for the amount of time it takes to shake it, then see if it improves.  If it does, chalk another mystery solved to me! ;)

DrummingFrenzy

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2003, 01:38 PM »
Smart idea. I actually thought about that, but now I'm trying to remember if my friends vintage ludwick kit that I did this on still had the rubber feet on it. Have you ever tried this before?

drumhero

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2003, 01:43 PM »
Sorry, can't say that I have.  But seeing as how my floor tom has been in the same place for the last two weeks, I'll go home and give it a try.

Offline Christopher

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2003, 01:50 PM »
I've noticed that before myself, I always thought it was that the drum had "sunk" into the carpet. I don't remember it happening on a hard surface. I sometimes cut up a soft mouse pad and tape some folded pieces together and sick them under the floor tom legs to improve resonance on hard surfaces. Poor man's RIMS.  :D
"What one man can do, another can do."
-Charles Morse (Anthony Hopkin's character from the 1997 movie, The Edge)

DrummingFrenzy

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2003, 01:51 PM »
Yeah, and let me know if it works for you. Just send me a message or something.

DrummingFrenzy

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2003, 01:52 PM »
good tip. haven't tried that Chirs.

Offline Louis Russell

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2003, 04:32 PM »
I can think of two possibilities.

1.  You have been smoking those left handed cigarettes made from whacky tobackie.

2.  As you play, you are getting leg creep on one of the legs and its putting stress on the shells.  I can't imagine it being enough to make a huge difference in sound.  Probably could be enough to notice at any rate.  

Solution:  Quit smoking those left handed cigs (they are bad for you anyway) or check your rubber feet to make sure they are in good shape.
No one will believe it's the "Blues" if you wear a suit, 'less you happen to be an old person, and you slept in it last night!

chefdoug

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2003, 06:18 PM »
Hmmm, interesting. i have a unique floor tom situation in that my 16" is on legs, but the legs are not actually attatched to the shell. Theres a rim around the bottom hoop and the legs are attatched to that, the rim sits on springs so it's like having a floating floor tom, yet it still sits on legs so I guess i'll never have this problem.

DirtBomb

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2003, 11:38 PM »
Maybe it is just dust inside the drum and/or dust stuck in between the rim and the head of the drum that is muffling it a little and when you shake it the dust moves around and stuff creating more resonance.

 ???thats my first guess anyhow

ritarocks

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2003, 11:54 PM »
no sh*t?  i gotta' try this.  be right back...
 oh man,  I forgot,  it's 1am and I'll wake up my neighbors...
this is exactly why I'm gonna' move way out in the woods...

felix

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2003, 05:42 AM »
Your nuts.

I'll tell you what is probably happening.  During loud music your eardrums actually compress and adjust to the loud volumes.

So, when you get up, the music stops, your ear drums start decompressing (I'm not a physiologist but I know the eardrum is a marvelous little device)...you shake your floor tom which moves your head a little and VOILA your hearing is more sensitive IE you hear more sustain in your floor tom.

That's my guess.

Drumschris

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2003, 01:15 PM »
I'm with Felix on this one. I don't think it has anything to do with the rubber feet "settling" or anything like that. If you're trying for that floating tom sound on your floor tom, spend $10 and get Pearl's Air Suspension Floor Tom Feet. They work great.

I'm also with Rita - I should move out of NYC to the woods. "Apartment" and "Drummer" are two words that just don't go together. Also, you should see me try to get my three timpani up and down the stairs. It's a funny site, really.

But I did just sign a lease for a private practice/teaching studio and repair shop!! Can't wait. I can move in on Feb. 1st.....

 

Offline Carlos Benson

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2003, 04:25 PM »
Now here's another tip, talk to your snare drum (talk nice stuff) at least 15 minutes everyday and pretty soon you'll notice that your paradiddles will be getting faster  ::) ... sorry, I couln't resist ...  :P, thanks for the tip!

Offline Bart Elliott

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2003, 04:51 PM »
I'm with Felix on this one. I don't think it has anything to do with the rubber feet "settling" or anything like that. If you're trying for that floating tom sound on your floor tom, spend $10 and get Pearl's Air Suspension Floor Tom Feet. They work great.


Or just rip up some high density foam and place a piece under each leg of your Floor Tom; it will sustain forever.

DrummingFrenzy

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Re:Floor Toms
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2003, 03:02 PM »
Quote
Your nuts.

I'll tell you what is probably happening.  During loud music your eardrums actually compress and adjust to the loud volumes.

It seems that I've stirred up some controversy about this. First of all let me say that I did not come up with this theory or trick. This is something that I know several drummers do. In regards to Felix's approach on it, it has nothing to do with my ears. I usually shake the drum when I first sit down at the kit. I'll walk over and hit the drum then I'll pick it up and shake and hit it again. I'm telling you it's more resonant. A drummer showed me this trick and I instantly heard the difference in sound. Whether it be from the compression of the rubber feet or not, the sound changed. I've haven't experiemented with this on very many kits so I don't know how it effects the different models and brands of floor toms.

 

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