Topic: Picking new projects  (Read 1220 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Matt Self (Gaddabout)

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 2755
    • My Space
Picking new projects
« on: May 11, 2009, 08:24 AM »
I'm jumping  back into playing and I have two new projects to pick from:

- An original project with less experienced players, but they're earnest and they want to play out some. The singer is, I think, potentially very talented. The rest of the band is a bit limited. Lots of practice is needed to iron out time and feel. The bass player has only been playing a year and he's 28-years-old with a hefty day job.

- An original project with very experienced players my age, but no real expressed ambition to play out any time soon. We're going to have a few practices to run through some songs the guitarist has sketched out. They're good, if only dated by about 30 years in sound and feel (very much into Toto/jazz-rock sound of the late 70s and early 80s). No vocals yet ... no lyrics written yet. Bassist is one of my good friends and is rock solid. Keyboardist is outstanding.

I'm obviously leaning towards the latter because life's too short to pass up an opportunity to play with good musicians. I'm going to be 40 later this month and I don't have any delusions of grandeur left in me. Still, part of wonders about this younger group because they're also great guys and it'd be hard to pas sup the opportunity to play in front of young, invigorating audiences that actually want to dance and enjoy the music.

Short of any further input, do y'all have any thoughts on this? What would you do? I can only do one because I only have time for one.
Odd meter isn't broken. It doesn't need to be fixed. - David Crigger

felix

  • Guest
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2009, 09:43 AM »
40 is the new 30.  You are young yet.  Enjoy playing as much as you can, seeing bands, rubbing elbows, being on the scene.

Feel it out and you will know by the sound and vibe what is cool.

Don't commit to anything too soon- just play your butt off.  Play and tell them what they want to hear.  Play what you hear too.

Try to play with some friends too.  that's always fun

Offline Chip Donaho

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 3647
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2009, 10:01 AM »
Are you kidding, people don't even give you a chance when you're 60. It doesn't matter if you play decent or not. I've been trying to find a band and they just look at me, "You're as old as my Dad". Probably have more desire to play too. I don't care if it's covers or originals either. It's not fair at all. I've gotten to the point where I refuse to tell a band my age, and I'm probably in better shape than they are.  ::)
Even with my cane.  :D
Craviotto-DW-Mapex-Slingerland
Paiste-Zildjian
"When you quit learning you start dying."-My Grandfather

Offline David Stanoch

  • Honorary VIP
  • Posts: 505
  • "Give the Drummer Some!"
    • david.stanoch
    • Rhythmelodic
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2009, 11:15 AM »
Hi Matt,
The noob & Chip know of what they speak!

Consider what you would find to be the most satisfying return on your time investment.

Are you ready to be a mentor to the younger players in return for the potential excitement?

I get that your hang w/your older buddies will bask you in the collective excellence their experience offers but may lead nowhere...Is it more important to you right now to GIG or just PLAY?

NO guarantee either way but these are still good problems. The answer may be neither scenario but something else not yet in view.

After you've driven the "play anything for the experience" road and want to find satisfaction in playing, I follow a triangular paradigm for my professional work.

The three constants are the Music, the People & the Money. It seems to me that in this paradigm, hitting on all three positively is ideal. Any two flowing positively make a situation work, at least for awhile, to varying degrees we can all figure out for ourselves. Only one doesn't cut it.

Money is such a strange irregularity in our business. Everyone, of course, wants to be paid to be appreciated. On a gig I'd love to do I might work for free if I have to, but if it's something I really DON'T want to do, I'm very expensive!!!  ;)

Not sure if these thoughts apply to your scenario upfront, but may be something to consider down the road.

Go with the NIKE mantra and "Just Do It!" I certainly agree w/Chip that you're not over-the-hill and the noob that getting together with both groups and feeling it out will answer the questions for you.

As always, enjoy the journey!






"You are only in competition with yourself" ~ Max Roach

donelk

  • Guest
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2009, 11:20 AM »
I vote for playing both! 

felix

  • Guest
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2009, 12:15 PM »
Hi David.  I have to ask... is that a hat or your real hair in the avatar?   ;D

Offline Matt Self (Gaddabout)

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 2755
    • My Space
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2009, 12:23 PM »
Are you ready to be a mentor to the younger players in return for the potential excitement?

This is a good question. When I stopped to think about it, I think this is what makes me hesitant to join them. They don't seem to have a real vision for what they want, and I would be constantly tempted to step in with my opinion. Not sure that's what they want from their drummer. They're thinking more alt-rock and I'm thinking their make-up is geared better towards an Evanescence kind of thing. The singer reminds me a lot of Amy Lee. Thinking about it more, I think they'd be better off just going with a drummer who will follow them as passionately as they follow their own musical instincts than someone who thinks he knows how to better garner commercial appeal. I dunno.

Playing out right now isn't a priority, just a desire. When I do play out, I want it to be worthwhile. I want to feel like I'm representing music I would listen to. That's probably more likely the latter. We shall see.

Thanks for the input y'all!
Odd meter isn't broken. It doesn't need to be fixed. - David Crigger

Offline Todd Norris

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 2143
  • Psalm 150:5
    • Fusion Drums
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2009, 11:16 PM »
Sounds like the latter situation is where you're leaning and that makes sense. 

I just wanted to put in a plug for the mentoring role.  As you all know I play snare in a bagpipe band and have for many years.  about 5 years ago I made a decision to drop from a line player in the advanced band, to the drum section leader of the less experienced group.  It turns out I really enjoy the teaching and leading of the players in that group.  Yes, it's frought with frustrations at times, but it's very rewarding to take a group of mostly young inexperienced players and do well in competition.  Obviously this situation is different than yours, but there may be some similarities that you'd find rewarding.

Offline eardrum

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 1754
  • It's not too late to get better!
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2009, 12:28 AM »
Gaddabout, I'm glad to hear your getting out.  Just my opinion but I'm not sure the young group is the best option.  Like you, I'm not 18 any more and playing with youngsters might be fun if they're really good or on a steep learning curve AND can relate to someone your age at all.  If you really are up for the big brother role (which would be great) I'd go for the band where there's an instant connection. For the older band, it might be good to have a discussion about how to make your sound a little more up to date.  Even if you don't there are a lot of people our age who still like the old stuff.  Good luck with it all and take care.

Offline Matt Self (Gaddabout)

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 2755
    • My Space
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2009, 11:20 PM »
Update:

I nixed both projects. I played with the older guys and was turned off by the guitarist. Just one of those things. It wasn't a musical problem -- I thought the chemistry was decent -- but a personal thing. Guy wasn't a jerk. Just not the kind of guy I can see myself hanging out with. Guess that's about all I should say. My reason to that group was I didn't feel I had much to contribute to what they were attempting to do and, frankly, that might as well have been the truth. It might be different if we were all 19 or 20 and in the midst of that era of music. Not interested in reinventing Mister Mister (which, BTW, grew out of a Phoenix jazz group called Pages years ago).

I called the kids earlier this week to tell them what I had concluded here. I say kids and I guess I should say, "kids." They're all in their mid- to late 20s. I spoke with Dana, the bass guitarist, and he's already having to bail. He's barely hanging on to his construction job. But I got a call from guitarist a few minutes ago and he asked if I could at least stop by on occasion to help them construct their songs and offer advice. I gave him drum lessons years ago and I guess we have that kind of rapport. For example, they're all excited over a new song they wrote ... a song called Dutch Oven. It's, of course, about passing gas underneath the covers and holding it in until your sleeping partner climbs into bed.

I suggested they hold that one for the B-side.

A friend on the board here put me on the trail of a cruise ship job with a shared acquaintance. I've got a call in for that, but since I haven't played regularly in a long time, I'm relatively certain I'm chasing windmills there. And it's probably not wise to walk away from gainful employment right now, especially a job with decent health care.

So I think I'm going to focus on putting together an original project, maybe start trying to write songs. Anyone know of any good band names? Maybe I should try The Gadabouts again? LOL

Man, I need to find a fun gig soon ...
Odd meter isn't broken. It doesn't need to be fixed. - David Crigger

Offline Chip Donaho

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 3647
Re: Picking new projects
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2009, 07:00 AM »
.... a song called Dutch Oven. It's, of course, about passing gas underneath the covers and holding it in until your sleeping partner climbs into bed.

I suggested they hold that one for the B-side.
Sounds like they did hold for the B-side or they wouldn't have thought of it.  :D
Craviotto-DW-Mapex-Slingerland
Paiste-Zildjian
"When you quit learning you start dying."-My Grandfather

 

Drummer Cafe RSS Feeds Drummer Cafe on Twitter Drummer Cafe on Facebook Drummer Cafe on YouTube Drummer Cafe on Pinterest Drummer Cafe on Instagram