Topic: Which electronic drum kit for a beginner?  (Read 350 times)

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Danny Mekon

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Which electronic drum kit for a beginner?
« on: June 27, 2020, 11:58 AM »
I am looking for some suggestions for beginner drum kits. I was just wondering what you guys think is a good electronic kit to get started on. I don't want the cheapest thing out there but I also don't want expensive either. so I guess something low-mid grade, I have filtered out some options.

https://www.amazon.com/Roland-Entry-level-Electronic-V-Drums-TD-1KV/dp/B00N9VMCAI/
https://www.amazon.com/Roland-Electronic-Drum-Set-TD-11KV/dp/B00AKQVUSA/
https://www.amazon.com/Alesis-Nitro-Electronic-Snare-Cymbals/dp/B07BW1XJGP/

Also what about Yamagadtx450k. I was reading its review on https://deboband.com/yamaha-dtx450k-review/ and they have written that its good for home practice, learning to play the drums.

Bart Elliott

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Re: Which electronic drum kit for a beginner?
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2020, 07:14 AM »
Just a brief preface to my response ...

I would not normally suggest that a bigger start out on an electronic drumkit... unless there is absolutely no way for that individual to own and play an acoustic drumkit due to the sound issue (ie. drums are too loud for where they live). One can always play on a "practice pad" to work on a lot of what is involved with drumming, although these pads have no sound, but are WAY cheaper.

The reasons I would suggest an acoustic drumkit to start with is that you can find these used for less money than electronics (although some of the options you've proved are indeed low in cost), the resale value is better with acoustic drums (electronics wear out over time), you don't need electricity with acoustics (you can play them anywhere)... and the biggest reason... you will learn to play on a real (acoustic) instrument that requires control, finesse, dexterity, and the ability to obtain a good sound. For the most part, none of these latter attributes are required when playing electronic drums.

With that said, if you are determined to start out on an electronic drumset, here are my thoughts:

You've listed a broad range of choices for possible electronic drumset choices... both in price and features.

Personally, I'm all about versatility. I want ANYTHING I purchase to work for me in a variety of ways, and having the ability to be expanded is a huge deal to me.

Assuming the product in question has received good reviews and feedback, I would want an electronic set-up that could be expanded beyond its basic configuration. MIDI In/Out Ports, ability to handle additional or substitute external sound sources, allowance for additional pads or at the very least being capable for repair, swapping out pads, etc., should they break or fail.

It would be great if you could actually play some of these electronic drum kits BEFORE you make the investment. I will say that if you are able to find a local music store or drum shop to tryout the drums, you should really purchase from them as well. It costs a lot of money to operate a "brick & mortar" store (I know, I'm a former drumshop owner), so it's not fair to the store to supply you with instruments to tryout for free... only to have you go and buy it off Amazon or the like. You may not have a local store, so this may be a moot point in your situation.

I don't have time to do the research for you as far as narrowing down your choice; you'll need to do that. Keep doing your research, figure out what features you need, look at the quality of the build, see what others have said about the instrument you are interested in, check your budget and go for it!

Be sure to report back and let us know what you decided to do.

 

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