Topic: Where's the next big thing?  (Read 18221 times)

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Offline Mister Acrolite

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2003, 01:08 PM »
When Gadd came out doing his thing, he was recognized in his community as great, but It wasnt until folks that he influenced came out that he was recognized as being influential was he?

No, actually he made a pretty big splash very quickly. Within the space of about a year, everybody was talking about him. Everybody wanted him on their records, and drummers were scrambling to understand and cop what he was doing. It was a pretty powerful thing to witness.

So we're just talking speculation here.  I think its just a matter of time.   Which brings us to your original question ... Who? ... It could be any of the folks we've all mentioned couldnt it.  

In theory, yes. But guys like Baron have been around a while. I don't know if he's going to have the impact Gadd did - frankly I doubt it. Copeland turned the world around with the Police's debut album. Maybe that's another unifying thing about the drummers I'm describing: their impact was basically immediate.

Colaiuta had that effect, particularly when he left Zappa and moved to LA. Manu Katche had that effect on his first records with Sting and Peter Gabriel. It's a rare and potent thing.
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sjm1112

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2003, 01:16 PM »
This is a GREAT thread. This is my take on what everyone has said. I do understand your point Mr. A, but I think what the other guys were trying to say is that in today's music industry anything that isn't stamped out of a machine to sound like everyone else is not given the freedom to get out to anyone outside the very small area they may play in. I would guess that if some band came out now sounding like the Police, the record companies would tell them to get a drummer that doesnt like his drums tuned so high, and why is he playing the hi-hats so much? I dont want this to be a recording industry rant so I will leave it at that, the fact of the matter is, they only want to make money, not break musical boundries. I could be way off on all of this, but it's my opinion.

Offline psycht

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2003, 01:25 PM »
Since technology has been brought up a few times I'll say this.

Akira Jimbo & Futureman may be added to the list. They are innovative with how they use technology in music (as a drummer).

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2003, 01:28 PM »
I agree sjm.

Gadd will be looked at 50 years from now as a "Baby Dodds" or Gene Krupa... as a quaint relic.


Offline Mark Schlipper

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2003, 01:32 PM »
Ahhh ... Immediate impact.   Again, in the jazz world, Id dare say Brian Blade has about done that.   And his occasional forays into pop have helped spread that word too.

I see what youre getting at and I think maybe you are right.   There isnt anyone.   Shame, but at the same time not.   Despite the inclination for us all to talk about cookie cutter pop music, fact is there is a tremendous window of opprotunity for creative music these days.   I mean I never wouldve thought a band like Slipknot would be able to go platinum.   And stuff that is essentially prog and fusion is finding its way into more mainstream sensabilities too.  

Personally I think its good that there is no one hero like Gadd or Copeland.   Because as we've seen here there are MANY great and unique players.   And while they may not have had the impact those in the past have had, maybe its because the pool is a bit diluted, with great and unique players?   And that aint a bad thing.    Maybe these hero's of the past made such a huge impact because there was so little else going on that was unique at the time?  Maybe the players of today arent making a huge impact because a dozen other guys are making a similar impact.  

Is it better to have one groundbreaking player that influences a million others or to have several groundbreaking players that influence thousands each?   I think you know where my vote lies :)
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felix

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2003, 01:52 PM »
This thread is extremely irritating to me.  It makes it painfully obvious that my drumming will make no impact in the music world.  That sux, especially after all the time and sacrifices I've given to drumming.  

This whole thread makes me feel that all my music is insignificant as well as my drumming.  Frankly lots of the guys mentioned don't really turn me on so much, cause frankly the music they played on was really masturbatory for the most part.   I mean I dig the drumming, but you guys get my drift.

Ya know, I havn't heard Neil Peart mentioned.  He prolly doesn't have half the chops of VC or VG but his band Rush is still together!  Cripe... Vinnie Calaiuta is worried about landing a Faith Hill gig and Steve Gadd is boring me to death playing with Eric Clapton.

To me, an influential drummer has to be in an influential band... PERIOD   ;D

BBJones

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #26 on: November 17, 2003, 02:14 PM »
Well if anyone is up for the challenge, I'll propose the next great wave of drummers:

4 limb playing, and yes I mean with sticks between your toes so no more pedals.

I've seen armless guys play with sticks between their toes and they played with their feet like Buddy Rich played with his hands so I know it can be done.  But I've yet to see a drummer who has arms and hands also pick up this idea for his feet.

So there ya go, one possible new ground-breaking drumming style that would have a major impact on drumming as we know it.

Oh, and this new style would appeal to everyone becuase you could play match grip with your hands while playing full traditional (right and left) with your feet.  The perfect balance! :P

Anyone going to try it out? :)

Offline psycht

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #27 on: November 17, 2003, 02:17 PM »

To me, an influential drummer has to be in an influential band... PERIOD   ;D

nicely put.

of course, the can is now open and worms are everywhere!

Offline random

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #28 on: November 17, 2003, 02:35 PM »
the person that got me started dreaming to be a drummer was a fictional character from a book. :P ;D ;) ;D :D 8) ??? :)

Offline Chris Whitten

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2003, 02:39 PM »
To me, an influential drummer has to be in an influential band... PERIOD   ;D
It might be 'nicely put' but it happens to be bolony.
An influential drummer is just that......who ever he or she plays with!
I can't even begin to reply to this topic.
People are saying Gadd is a 'quaint relic'
Oh please  ???

Offline random

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #30 on: November 17, 2003, 02:41 PM »
bolony.
BALOGNA!!!  BALOGNA DANCE!!!!

balogna balogna balogna balogna balogna


pronounced ba-log-na, this traditional dance, of the Odd Sounding Lunch Meat Tribe, contains wild gyrations while jumping up and down.  traditional instruments are pogo sticks, salami, and really cool ink pens that make a cool whistling noise when you take them apart and blow in one end.

Offline Mister Acrolite

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #31 on: November 17, 2003, 02:44 PM »
the person that got me started dreaming to be a drummer was a fictional character from a book. :P ;D ;) ;D :D 8) ??? :)

That's interesting.

It has nothing to do with what this thread is about, but it's interesting. Thanks for sharing.
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Offline random

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2003, 02:46 PM »
That's interesting.

It has nothing to do with what this thread is about, but it's interesting. Thanks for sharing.
sounded like it might fit... :-[ :-X :'(

Offline Chris Whitten

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #33 on: November 17, 2003, 03:26 PM »
the person that got me started dreaming to be a drummer was a fictional character from a book. :P ;D ;) ;D :D 8) ??? :)

Yeah Mr A. LOL
Now I know why there aren't any innovative drummers around.

Offline random

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #34 on: November 17, 2003, 04:35 PM »
Yeah Mr A. LOL
Now I know why there aren't any innovative drummers around.

and just what is that supposed to mean?

DrumerFromSysinoid

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Re:Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #35 on: November 17, 2003, 05:45 PM »
i find this thread has been more of an inspiration for me to go out and try and do something great and ground breaking....no idea what yet....ooooh i know.... :D

Offline Gregg Rivers

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #36 on: November 17, 2003, 06:05 PM »
Well I'll stick my foot in this pool! And perhaps in my mouth! But Mr. A,  I truly believe the reason we don't have any hugely influential drummers is exactly why felix mentioned. There are no new super groups! No staying power. No consistency. All the bands are around for an album or two and then they're history. No more Led Zepplins. No Beatles No nothing of the sort. The music industry has become such a flash in the pan kind of thing, no one stands out any more. Not that there aren't any outstanding players, but you name a drummer that has come up in the ranks in the past 10 years that can compare to guys like Joey Kramer, Neil Peart, Charlie Watts, and other greats that still gig and sell records. I could go on but I think the point is made. Music is fickle and most certainly so are the people and fans that buy the CD's and help good bands (and drummers) become great bands and legends. You can't be the influence if nobody's listening! No matter how great you are.
Now here's the disclaimer..... The above is just MY opinion and I fully realize that I don't have ALL the answers. But I'm pretty sure that this opinion is based on some sound reasoning.  ;D...but it IS an opinion!  ;)
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nycowboy

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #37 on: November 17, 2003, 06:22 PM »
But I'm not being as completely caught off guard by any of the new guys like I was when I first heard Gadd, Copeland, Bozzio, etc.
Just a thought: could it be that, with all the great drummers out there, we've come to expect more?

Another possibility is that sometimes we run through "dry spells" where there just isn't anything new.  I think if you trace the history of drumset playing, you'll find large gaps, with a few exceptions, between impact players.  Here's my short list (my aplogies to anyone who felt I left out some of their favorites.  I did not include rock players in this because I am not very well-versed with most of them.  My tastes run to classical and jazz.  So, please, don't be insulted.  I do realize that there were/are some impact players there, as well.):
Baby Dodds: early 1900's (Not a "quaint relic".  Without him, we wouldn't be having this discussion in the first place.)
Chick Webb: 1930's (First true big band player who really could drive a band.)
Buddy Rich: 1940's (First player with great chops.  Gene Krupa was a great showman, but he did not have the musical impact Buddy did.)
Kenny Clarke/Max Roach: 1940's (Chicken/egg argument concerning how the concept of playing time changed.)
Tony Williams: 1960's (Yes, Tony was influenced by Max/Elvin/Philly Joe, but, man, did he ever change the way drums were phrasing!  Not to mention what he did later on in the late 1960's - early 1970's with his own groups.)
Finally, Steve Gadd: 1970's -

So if you take a look, except for the 1940's there were huge gaps historically.  The 1940's were an anomaly because the music changed so radically (from swing to bebop; big band to small group focus).

Personally, I'm going to enjoy all the great drummers out there without being too concerned with whether they are breaking new ground or not.  In fact, a lot of drummers that I absolutely admire are not what I would consider ground breakers...they're just great players, period.

Still, Mr. A, this is a terrific thread!!

Offline Tkitna

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #38 on: November 17, 2003, 06:54 PM »
Immediate impact is the key. That is why its so tough. Felix hit on something when he stated that music has imploded. I agree with him, but its only my taste in music that allows me to agree. To me, new music today consists of pop (Brittany, etc,,), punk, metal, and probably some jazz that I have no idea about. I just dont hear any music today that is different than anything else in the last 5 to 10 years and so forth the immediate impact is lost. (The last band that I thought was good when they came out was Wanderlust and they only made one record.)

I do think later on in his career, Josh Freeze will be looked up to by his peers, but it will take some time. This all opinion and i have a very short tolerance for most of the newer music out today so dont beat me up to bad. I just havent heard a drummer or any music that has been different in awhile.

Offline Bart Elliott

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Where's the next big thing?
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2003, 08:09 PM »
Akira Jimbo & Futureman may be added to the list.

I was thinking of suggesting that Akira Jimbo be added to the list. He has definitely taken the whole electronic thing to a new level; definitely innovative. But who's going to play Akira Jimbo licks? The way he's impacted the drumming community and music is very different than Gadd, Cobham, etc., did it.

Personally I would not put Futureman on the list. Although he does some cool stuff, I think the instrument he uses is unique (even innovative), but what he does is pretty middle of the road; nothing groundbreaking. Besides, it's not drums but drum samples ... although he does play some drum/perc from time to time. Who else is playing the instrument he's using?

So I would vote for Jimbo ... even though there are many guys using electronics within the acoustic set, his musicianship and innovativeness is definitely unique ... and it's impacted a wide audience ... permanently.

 

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