Topic: Recording  (Read 8648 times)

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Offline Funkadrummer

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Recording
« on: April 21, 2004, 07:15 AM »
Well my band will soon be looking to record, maybe by the end of the summer and I don't know what to look for in a recording studio. I am not sure what our budget is but I wouldnt say more than $1300. Can you guys help me?

Thanks

Gretschn

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Re:Recording
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2004, 07:24 AM »
Drums are the most difficult and crucial part of the recording. When you are recording you want to make sure that the studio has a good room sound. I like an open woody room. Nothing with carpet and foam all over the place. Also mics would be another important part of the recording process. You want to make sure you have a variety of mics to use to experiment with different sounds. I notice when I record with a crafty engineer he puts mics all around the drum kit and all around the room to acheive different sounds. Good luck to you.

Offline Jon E

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Recording
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2004, 07:56 AM »
The two biggest pieces of advise I always give are:

1) Have your gear in good shape--relatively new heads, tuned well, no squeeks from pedals, etc.

2)  DON'T REHEARSE IN THE STUDIO!!  Have your songs well rehearsed BEFORE you get there.


Mime in money!! ;)


Offline Chris Whitten

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Recording
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2004, 08:38 AM »
As you specifically asked about what to look for in a studio I'd back up Gretschn's comments.
Make sure the room is good for recording drums in. It may not be just down to materials in the room (wood etc). I'd ask to hear some live drums that have been recorded in the room on past sessions.
A decent mic cabinet and decent desk etc...would be a plus.
Does the engineer sound like they know what they're doing? Are they experienced and/or pleasant to work with?
Those are good starting points.

ocdp

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Re:Recording
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2004, 09:13 AM »
yeah the size of the room is important too, you dont want to record in a room with a bunch of echo , well unless you want that on a song.
and like john said....be ready to get in there and record..dont waiste your money and time screwing around with changing parts of the songs. good luck!
(are you looking for a professional studio, or a small local one that charges by the hour??)

Offline psycht

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Re:Recording
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2004, 09:50 AM »
Call various studios in your area (even if its a days drive) and ask to listen to their work.   Do they record digitally or on tape (or both)? Does their work sound good to you?  

What are you expecting to record for $1300?

Offline Funkadrummer

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Re:Recording
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2004, 10:01 AM »
Call various studios in your area (even if its a days drive) and ask to listen to their work.   Do they record digitally or on tape (or both)? Does their work sound good to you?  

What are you expecting to record for $1300?

Between 4-6 songs

Here are two studios I have been looking into.

http://www.cuerecording.com/The%20Red%20Room.htm
http://www.cuerecording.com/studiod.htm

Their Rates - http://www.cuerecording.com/boing.htm

-Josh


felix

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Recording
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2004, 10:06 AM »
cool name, OCDP- I like that

there is a place in town that has the most incredible room for drums *well at least around here*

It's a big room, I'd say 20' x 30' with about a 15'+ vaulted ceiling.

It is all paneled with 1/4 sawn walnut (about 200 + years old) and has huge beams as part of the headers and main roof supports.  I think the floor is paneled with a 1/4 of it stone/or block- can't remember.

This room just has so much "air" to the sound just the real light verb tail stuff/no slap back or echo or mid rangy resonance.  It just sounds amazing.  The outside even sorta looks medeival.  There's a GIANT fireplace in there as well.  It has the feel of playing outdoors but with an incredibly intimate and clear sound.  I don't know how they did it- his dad built it and that guy was a genius (built the board and amps- even the digital filters/ back in the 80's!). The sound always feel as if it's being funneled away from you... no matter how hard or light you play- it's always coming out and not coming "back" at you.  I can't imagine what the real high dollar studios in LA and NY sound like.  My friend recorded at "The Complex" I think it's called in Burbank and he said that was a trip.  The engineer actually wore white gloves through the sessions.  Funny thing was- the sound wasn't all that!  And the playing was definitely there.  Weird- I know nothing.


Offline Paul DAngelo

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Recording
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2004, 10:27 AM »
The two biggest pieces of advise I always give are:

1) Have your gear in good shape--relatively new heads, tuned well, no squeeks from pedals, etc.

2)  DON'T REHEARSE IN THE STUDIO!!  Have your songs well rehearsed BEFORE you get there.
Excellent points!  Especially relatively new heads.  I would recommend against putting on new heads directly before the recording session.  Give 'em a week or so of playing them before you start to record.

The 2nd point should be well heeded.  Have all of your parts worked out before you even step into the studio.  In one of our series of sessions, we had practiced the songs with no vocals so we would be able to lay down the musical tracks together.  Got all of our cues straight.  It paid off, musically and financially.

Every minute you spend in the studio costs $$$$, so be well prepared.

When you're going through Hell, keep going.  (Winston Churchill)

Offline Chris Whitten

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Recording
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2004, 10:27 AM »
Funkadrummer,
Those studios look pretty good.
I'd go with the Red Room (Pro Tools HD and API EQ and Pre Amps). It also looks like a nice room for drums and a good mic selection.
You could do two 10 hour days in your budget.
Day One: Backing tracks and/or as much as you can get done in the time available.
Day Two: The odd outstanding overdub and mixing.
Don't forget to budget enough time for mixing.
It's a VERY important process.

LuvmyLeedy

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Re:Recording
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2004, 11:52 AM »
there is some good advice in this thread already, but i will add my 2 cents based on my experience as a professional engineer/producer.

when choosing a room listen with your ears, not your eyes! the room may look incredible, the mic locker might be full of cool looking mics, racks of nifty outboard gear etc. but what you have to do is LISTEN to what the guy has already done with other people. especially projects with a similar budget as yours. and even if it's different styles of music than you do, you will get an idea of whether the engineer knows how to get good sounds or not. check out the vocal sounds. that is as important as the drum sound. it's what any record and booking people will be listening to the most. aside from your budget limitation that is what you should base your decision on, not how cool or woody or big the room looks.

talk with the engineer and tell him your budget. ask him how the time will be spent in order to bring it in for the money you have. see if it seems realistic how the time is breaking down. see if he understands the kind of sound you are looking to get. try to find someone versatile rather than someone who specializes in a particular type of music, unless that is the exact type you play.

Jeremykade

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Re:Recording
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2004, 02:29 PM »
Has anyone tried recording themselves, thats usually what I do. I have a Powerbook g4 and my friend has an iMAC with an mBOX and it works great. If any of you have heard of Shane Barnard (christian guitarist) or Will Hunt (drummer) they use the same set up. It really works great if you have the $$ and mics. I think it'll save on cash also because wont have to pay by the hour in a studio, just a idea..

Drummz

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Recording
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2004, 11:06 PM »

It's a big room, I'd say 20' x 30' with about a 15'+ vaulted ceiling. It is all paneled with 1/4 sawn walnut (about 200 + years old) and has huge beams as part of the headers and main roof supports.

Wow Felix, that sounds like a great place to record drums! What area is it you live in?

bonejoy

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Re:Recording
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2004, 08:49 AM »
For what it's worth......If it's just a demo you're recording, i'd say this...6 tracks is too much. 3 tracks is the norm.  In two 10 hour sessions, you won't have time to record 6 songs properly.  Also, I'm not convinced anymore that spending money for studio time to record a demo is worthit....for the budget you have, you could get a Boss BR1180 8 track portable studio desk, and some mics.  If you have a PC, get some half decent mixing software on it.  If you need more than 8 tracks you can back the wav file onto your PC ready for the mix.  At least this way, you can take as long as you want to record things and keep on recording in the future.  You can play about with different mic techniques yourself to get the sound right for your music.  This is how my band does it.  We recorded a song onto the Boss last year (we didn't use any mixing software, just the standard tools on the Boss - of which there are loads!) Then we went into a studio and did a 'proper' recording of the same song (We got the studio free so that was OK) but to cut a long story short, the recording we did on the boss (after several beers) was far better!!!!  We're gonna be getting the 16 track version of the Boss 1180 fairly soon too.....

Hope this gives you some food for thought......

Drummz

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Re:Recording
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2004, 09:04 AM »
you could get a Boss BR1180 8 track portable studio desk, and some mics.

Good advice!

If it's just a band demo it is typically not worth the kind of money studios get. Just find a good room in someone's house where the drums sound good in or make a room into a place to record. You can buy a decent digital recorder like the Boss, Yamaha, Tascam, or Fostex, and then some decent mics for less than that studio time. If you read up on it and do it right I think you will be surprised how good of a sound you can get. I have heard some pretty decent recordings made with an analog 4 track recorder some years ago. Besides there are some very nice digital multitrackers out there nowadays at very reasonable prices.

Like Bonejoy said, it will be money well spent because you can record anything, anytime down the road at your own pace. I will be buying one myself in the near future I am sure. It just makes sense.

felix

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Re:Recording
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2004, 10:34 AM »
It's over at Suma/ east of Painesville I-90/Vrooman Rd.

All the great 70's bands recorded there.  Grand Funk, Wild Cherry are a couple of the big ones.

felix

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Re:Recording
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2004, 10:39 AM »
And for 1300 bucks the kid should be able to get a great recorded cd at just a project studio.

I wouldn't buy a digital 4 or 8 track.  It just doesn't make sense.  You will have 1300 bucks in the thing have a crappy room and bad mics and crappy pre's, plus someone that isn't experience running the stuff.  Most guys will do it $100-250 day.  300 for top studios around here.  Cut a deal.

Drummz

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Recording
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2004, 11:18 AM »
I suppose if you can do it for $300 bucks do it that way for sure. You are lucky to have found a place to do it that cheap felix.

A couple studios I have looked at around here are quite a bit more expensive than that. More like $45 - $50 per hour or $500 - $600 a day and that's just for studio time. That doesn't include mixing, editing, or mastering.

bonejoy

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Re:Recording
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2004, 11:27 AM »
I believe that with studios...you get what you pay for!!  Try skimping by going for a cheap studio....and you might as well throw your money in the air....

Offline Chris Whitten

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Recording
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2004, 11:36 AM »
I've worked in many great, but cheap studios.
You've just got to check out the engineer, the room, previous track record and the equipment (as mentioned before).
BTW, I agree about going ultra cheap if this is a demo session. Do we know that yet though?

 

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