Topic: Drummer position- recognized as talant  (Read 2674 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Jazzman

  • Guest
Drummer position- recognized as talant
« on: August 06, 2002, 09:40 PM »
Is it due to the position of the drummer that they are not looked upon as playing a big role in the group to the folks listening to the band?  This would be due to their floor position in the band?  Buddy Rich, Gene krupa were always out front when they were featured with the bands set up around them.

Being on stage on a elevated platform helped the status of the drummer, and not just for the sound of it.  Lighting, the amount of space for the drummer on the elevated platforms, and the other percussion players that share the same space adds to the audiences awareness of the drummer (or percussion)on stage.  I think the drummer being tucked away by him/herself lost the drummer identity on stage within  the group.

I think due to the glitz, lighting, and shoemanship of the drummer these days has allowed the drummer to come out of the closet so to speek.

I believe that this is true. :-\

Your take.........

Jazzman 8)

Mark Schlipper

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 6671
  • drum + hand
    • chock full o' creamy goodness
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2002, 10:35 PM »
i think the role of drummer is not looked at as a big role because of a couple reasons.  

1) most drummers seek "the pocket" ... that elusive space where you blend in perfectly with a song.  its a lack of ego that isnt found on most "up front" musical roles.

2) most of the public views drumming as "easy".  youve got a half a dozen things around you and you swing at 'em.  in this same regard, it has a more "low-brow" stature.  (note: same common misconception about bass, but lets not get into that :))

how do i feel about these things? well, i dont think you need to be flashy.  serving the music is key.  be it a solid groove, or loose and textural.  i feel the same about all instruments.  if that means, being a backline player, so be it.  and about point 2, ive given up caring.  all i can say to the public is "its not easier, just different".  

im perfectly ok being considered a smaller part of a band.  because i know, that in the end, thats not the case.  i have my way of playing and it makes its stamp on the music.  and my bandmates know and respect that.  if they didnt, they wouldnt be my bandmates :)

DirtBomb

  • Guest
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2002, 10:36 PM »
Quote
Is it due to the position of the drummer that they are not looked upon as playing a big role in the group to the folks listening to the band?  

I think that we are looked down upon by people who aren't musicians because they look at us and think "I could do that, he's just bangin away up there".  Some people who have no idea what tehy are talking about can be very ignorant in that respect.  that is my opinion though.

BlackEvovii

  • Guest
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2002, 10:41 PM »
Ive noticed that alot.  When i was back in HS, i had a couple of friends i use to play with, but than times changed and we grew apart.  One day, they were talking about a coffee house they played out at(3 guitarists) and i was all, why didn't you guys invite me? and the one kid replies, you play heavy music.  So, i said, beats are all the same, regardless of the genre of music...yea i got him good.

SteveG

  • Guest
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2002, 06:22 AM »
It is due to the ignorance of the other musicians and listeners. Educated musicians and listeners realize a good drummer when they hear one. Drummers are the equivalent to an offensive lineman in football. They are usually not recognized until they make a mistake unless of course they wear a mask or can twirl their sticks 100mph.

MVanDoren1

  • Guest
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2002, 07:22 AM »
One thing that bugs me to no end is not being able to physically see every person I'm playing with.  I've commented on other threads concerning eye contact and its importance in getting to know the other musicians.  At any rate, due to this felt need of seeing the other musicians, a band I was with several years ago had to undergo a slight change.  What effect it had on peoples conceptions of the drummer, I don't recall specific quotes but people seemed to enjoy being able to see more of what I was doing.  We set up so that the keyboard player and I faced each other where my right side faced the audience.  The bass and electric guitarist were in the center such that the instrumentalists surrounded the vocalists.  Now perhaps you may think of problems pretty quickly such as the resonant heads not facing the audience, etc.  but I played with a shield anyway so that really wasn't a factor.  I felt better, the audience got to see more because I and the keyboard player didn't have instruments in front of our hands- they could better see what we were doing.

Tony

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 2192
  • Art is the expression of the self.
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2002, 07:59 AM »
I think another reason why we are overlooked is because we stay behind our drums, which acts as a barrier to the audience.  Drummers don't have the ability to move around a stage, reach out and touch the crowd, etc.  We are isolated from our bandmates and from the fans.  I can't tell you how many times I have wished to be the "frontman" in my youth, just to have the opportunity to meet some better looking women  :-*  Guitarists, singers, etc. get to lay their instrument down at the end of the gig and mingle.  We're stuck packing and carting huge cases and what not.  Just my thoughts on this topic.

Jim Martin (cavanman)

  • Cafe VIP
  • Posts: 1059
  • "And I do the Cha-Cha like a little sissy Girl"
Re:Drummer position- recognized as talant
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2002, 10:57 AM »
One of my favorite drummers is Duffy Jackson.  I've seen him perform live in many situations.  Duffy is a bear about 5'10" and 275lbs is very friendly, and always has a big smile and loves to talk to fans.  As a leader, his set is front and center......

I saw Duffy in Miami, FL about 1978 in a production of Ain't Misbehavin.' So cool. He played with some of the local jazz heavies (remember that noted jazz school , Univ. of Miami is there) in the band which was always _ON_ STAGE_ as opposed to dwon in the pit. The prodduction included a rolling band stand that would roll out to the very front center of the stage for all to see this great band swing like crazy. Then it would roll back when the actors came on stage. Just great.  He's a 'swing high' guy [Louis Bellson].
It all seemed like it was presented as it should have been and everybody got to see the drums/drummer close up.

 

Drummer Cafe on Twitter Drummer Cafe on Facebook Drummer Cafe on YouTube Drummer Cafe on Pinterest Drummer Cafe on Instagram